Genealogical Gems: Hiding in Plain Sight

Sunday, November 12, 2017

picture originally found on www.vgs.org for the conference.  
This post is part of the November Genealogy Blog Party on My Descendant's Ancestors. Check it out today!

 I attended my first Genealogy conference a few weeks ago here in Virginia.  My family and I were at the local library when I noticed a poster for the poster for the VGS annual conference, Genealogical Gems:  Hiding in Plain Sight.  I don't normally get to spend a day on myself so I jumped at the opportunity to attend!  I figured why not?  It was practically in my backyard.


I spent the day on Track 2 which featured Sharon Cook MacInnes, PhD, CG from www.ancestortracks.com Her presentations included:
  • Researching State Land Records for the 20 State-Land States: Deeds & Tax Records
  • Researching Federal Land Records for the 30 Federal-Land States, Including Military Grants.
  • Getting the Most Out of Ancestry.
  • Using the FAN Club to Tear Down Brick Walls.
Now I have to say, I thought I had done pretty well following my family history in New Jersey.  There were some ancestors who I thought I had "finished" (finished as I thought I would ever get with them ;) ) and boy was I wrong!  Now granted it will be a bit before I can get up to the NJ archives to start digging again, however, I'm excited to make another trip up to Jersey to tackle more land records!   
In the meantime, I will be searching Virginia land grants.  I already found the original land grant for my neighborhood!  It's so neat to see the land exchange hands between the crown and the original owners.  Plus I now know how some roads got its name.

Stay tuned for what I find thanks to my new found knowledge!  

Don't forget to like my fb page!

2 comments:

genealogylizgauffreau said...

Good luck with your additional research, armed with new enthusiasm and resources! I love the library photo illustrating your post.

Lisa Gorrell said...

I don't think we'll ever be 'finished.' There may always be more "offline" stuff we can find. However, to preserve for the future, we might want to produce a "final" product (at least final when we wrote it).

Post a Comment